Pure Beeswax Guernsey candles sell well at St Martin farmers’ market

January 29th, 2013 by Richard Lord

Rosie Dorey buys a Pure Beeswax Guernsey candle from Sue Wareham at the St Martin farmers' market on 22 December 2012 (click image to expand - ©RLLord)

Sue Wareham has been making beautiful pure beeswax candles for a long time but mostly giving them away as gifts.

In November 2012 she began to sell her handmade candles under the trading name Pure Beeswax Guernsey at the Guernsey Tourist Information Centre in St Peter Port.

A selection of Pure Beeswax Guernsey candles for sale at the farmers' market in the St Martin parish hall on 22 December 2012 (click image to expand - ©RLLord)

And in early December 2012 Sue and her husband Roy began selling the pure beeswax candles at the farmers’ market in the St Martin parish hall.

The Guernsey Museum shop in Candie Gardens and the Lovelypop shop at 25 Mill Street, St Peter Port also sell Pure Beeswax Guernsey candles.

Pure Beeswax Guernsey candles for sale at the farmers' market in the St Martin parish hall on 22 December 2012 (click image to expand - ©RLLord)

The National Trust of Guernsey Folk and Costume Museum sold Sue’s beeswax polish, but the shop doesn’t reopen until March 2013 when they hope to restock with Pure Beeswax Guernsey products.

Pure Beeswax Guernsey candles made by Sue Wareham (click image to expand - ©RLLord)

The Pure Beeswax Guernsey candles are, as they state, made from 100% beeswax. The candles have no added perfume so they produce a very pleasant, mild beeswax aroma. Also, they don’t drip under normal conditions if kept out of a strong draught.

Spiral candles made by Sue Wareham of Pure Beeswax Guernsey (click image to expand - ©RLLord)

Sue Wareham has six beehives. She uses all the beeswax they produce, and her brother-in-law in England also supplies her with beeswax from his hives.

Roy said “sales are going well so we won’t have enough beeswax but we can buy a very good commercially available beeswax from England, which we will use to top up our supply.”

Dinner table candles made by Sue Wareham of Pure Beeswax Guernsey (click image to expand - ©RLLord)

All the wicks are made of natural cotton. To make the candle burn properly the candles were tested with 47 different thicknesses of wick.

In theory the bigger the candle, the bigger the wick is required.

“The trick is to balance the two so that the candle burns perfectly, without dripping, right to the edge,” Sue Wareham said.

A selection of Pure Beeswax Guernsey candles for sale at the farmers' market at the St Martin parish hall on 22 December 2012 (click image to expand - ©RLLord)

The smallest candle is the votive candle, which is also sold in a little pouch or bag.

Votive or prayer candles are traditional intended to be burned as an offering in a religious ceremony. They are used by a number of religions.  The term also refers to a standard size of candle two inches high and 1.5 inches in diameter.

Pure beeswax polish by Pure Beeswax Guernsey (click image to expand - ©RLLord)

Pure Beeswax Guernsey currently sells eight different candles, which are each named after a Channel Island, and the pure beeswax furniture polish. Pure Beeswax Guernsey also plans to sell candle stands in the near future.

Roy and Sue Wareham of Pure Beeswax Guernsey at the farmers' market in the St Martin parish hall on 22 December 2012 (click image to expand - ©RLLord)

“Pure Beeswax Guernsey won three prizes and a trophy for the candles at the Guernsey Beekeepers’ Association show in October 2012, and received a second prize in one of the honey classes,” Sue Wareham said.

Guernsey Beekeepers' Association Awards won by Sue Wareham of Pure Beeswax Guernsey (click image to expand - image courtesy of Pure Beeswax Guernsey)

  1. No Comments

Have your say