Guernsey Rovers Athletic Club plants tamarisk trees with the help of The Guernsey Society of the Men of the Trees

January 16th, 2011 by Richard Lord

On a sunny and windy Saturday morning, members of the Guernsey Rovers Athletic Club with help from The Guernsey Society of the Men of the Trees and the Guernsey Tree Wardens planted several rows of Tamarix sp. trees on an earth bank to the north-west of the sports fields.

Andrew McCutcheon with Rovers AC tree planting volunteers (click image to expand - ©RLLord)

Tamarix or tamarisk are tolerant of salt-laden air, and saline and sandy soil.  They develop a deep taproot to reach groundwater.  They originate in the Nile region of Egypt and were imported to Europe to stabilise river and ditch banks.

Volunteers from the Rovers Athletic Club planting tamarisk tree whips along the berm (click image to expand - ©RLLord)

The Guernsey Society of the Men of the Trees (GMOTT) paid for the Tamarix whips which were supplied by Guernsey Gardens Ltd.

The length of the earth bank was planted with about two whips per metre.

Andrew McCutcheon decided to reduce the height of the tamarisk whips to reduce their movement in the strong wind and allow the roots to settle down and establish themselves.

Andrew McCutcheon, Guernsey Tree Warden Coordinator and Secretary of The Guernsey Society of the Men of the Trees, uses clippers to reduce the height of the tamarisk whips (click image to expand - ©RLLord)

Wood chips, which were also paid for by The Guernsey Society of the Men of the Trees, were supplied and delivered by Dave Brouard and spread all around the recently planted whips along the top of the earth bank.

Filing up buckets of wood chips to spread along the top of the tree planted earth bank (click image to expand - ©RLLord)

Paul Porter of Rovers AC fills up buckets with wood chips while others spread wood chips around the Tamarisk along the top of the earth bank (click image to expand - ©RLLord)

After almost three hours the work was done.  The tamarisk will provide some wind protection to the playing fields and add beauty and enhance biodiversity when established.

Paul Porter, a Director of Rovers A.C. and Cricket Secretary, said that several tree plantings had taken place at Rovers AC.

The archery field had been delineated by several rows of blackthorn or sloe, Prunus spinosa.

Blackthorn, Prunus spinosa, (also known as sloe) planted to delineate the archery range at the Rovers Athletic Club (click image to expand - ©RLLord)

Several years ago several tree species including common alder, Alnus glutinosa, grey willow or sallow, Salix cinerea, and black poplar, Populus nigra, were planted to border the south side of the field.  These trees are now well established.

Common alder and other tree species border the south side of the Rovers AC sports fields (click image to expand - ©RLLord)

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